Nicaragua Travel: 8 Tips for Traveling in Nicaragua

August 25, 2015
Nicaragua travel
Nicaragua Travel: 8 Tips for Traveling in Nicaragua.

If you’re planing to travel to Nicaragua, there’s some information you should know before you go.  Here’s eight tips that will help make you journey a bit easy — and a lot more fun.

1. If you enter Nicaragua by airplane, you will land at the international airport in Managua. If you, like many other travellers, want to exchange money, do NOT exchange it there. The exchange rates are way too high! There are many other money exchange services in Managua or every bank can exchange your money with reasonable rates.

2. Handmade and fresh cheese, tortillas, butter, bread, cookies, cakes, etc. can be bought in small shops (pulperias), cheese shops, local bakeries and so on and not necessarily in big supermarkets. The food from the small vendors is fresher, more delicious and cheaper. A good deal I would say.*

Nicaragua Travel: 8 Tips for Traveling in Nicaragua

3. Very often, mangoes, avocados, bananas, lemons, etc. can just be picked from the trees or the ground below the trees.

4. In some areas it’s better not to walk at night–especially dark and abandoned streets. Always walk in groups or at least with another person. It´s better to take a taxi at night. Especially as a woman solo traveler, you need to be a bit more careful.

Wall painting

5. Avoid traveling on Sundays if possible. Busses (except the high frequented routes, e.g. Granada – Masaya – Managua – Leon) or ferries don´t serve very regularly. Even locals often don´t know the timetables or if buses or ferries serve on that day at all.

6. If you fall sick, avoid the public hospitals. They are free but the hygienic and service standards are just horrible. It´s always better to spend your money in private hospitals that have doctors with good standards and expertise.

Nicaragua Travel: 8 Tips for Traveling in Nicaragua

7. Avoid taxi drivers who want to force you to take their taxi and put a lot of pressure on you (e.g. in Managua). Tell them that you don´t need their service and look for a taxi driver on your own. Especially in Managua, taxi drivers ask tourists for a lot more than the usual price. Ask a bus driver or some local pedestrians for advice about the normal taxi price, so that you can bargain reasonably.

8. It’s a “must” to speak some Spanish if you want to travel comfortably in Nicaragua. Many people, except in touristy areas, don´t speak any English. If you don´t speak Spanish, try to learn at least some common words and sentences before you start your journey. That way you will definitely enjoy it more.

I hope these tips are useful for you! If you think something is missing, feel free to add a comment below.

 

Nicaragua Travel: 8 Tips for Traveling in Nicaragua

About Sarah Schmidt

Sarah SchmidtI did my Bachelor Degree in Business Administration/Marketing at the University of Pforzheim and my Master Degree in Integrated Natural Resource Management at the Humboldt University Berlin. I’ve lived in Berlin, Karlsruhe, Hyderabad (India), Mumbai, Bangkok, Bogotá and León (Nicaragua), and currently I´m traveling around South America for doing volunteer work, that is related to my master studies (natural conservation, reforestation, agro-forestry, permaculture, biodiversity conservation, etc.). I love to travel in a sustainable and nature-close way, to discover other countries, cultures, traditions, and languages, and to learn more about our world and nature, and how to protect it, as best as I can.

8 thoughts on “Nicaragua Travel: 8 Tips for Traveling in Nicaragua

  1. Avatar
    October 29, 2015
    Reply

    Great tips. It’s such a colourful looking country. We are heading there in Feb and will avoid travelling on a Sunday. If you were to spend a month in one place where would it be? Thanks for sharing!

    • Sarah Schmidt
      Sarah Schmidt
      October 29, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Gemma,
      thanks for your comment! I think my two favourite, and really spectacular places in Nicaragua were Isla de Ometepe and the Caribbean “Corn Island”. I could easily spend one month there 🙂 On Isla de Ometepe, for example, are several eco-villages, where you can volunteer and don´t have to spend money for accommodation and food. One of these is “Finca Zopilote” – I have been there, and I really loved it 🙂

  2. Avatar
    Lori
    September 7, 2015
    Reply

    Hi Sarah,
    Your travels and education sound like an adventure, and a real life learning experience (which I find to be the best kind -smile).

    Now that it is September 2015, and the fact that your studies in Leon, Nicaragua should be just about finished based on your article above, do you plan on sharing all your newest real world tips you’ve learned since your last post? I am extremely interested in hearing about your Leon experience as well. Thank you, TravelTiger

    • Sarah
      Sarah
      September 7, 2015
      Reply

      Hi TravelTiger!
      Thank you so much for you comment! 🙂
      True, I finished my project in Nicaragua some time ago. It was a great experience and I have learned a lot for my career and – even more important – for myself and about myself.
      Here I have documented a bit about the project so far, but I am going to write soon something like an “summary-post” or “resumé” about it: http://saritastravelmoments.com/category/project-nicaragua/
      Furthermore I was traveling in Guatemala and Mexico after I finished the project and I will also soon write about my adventures in this fantastic countries full of great places and people!

    • Sarah
      July 13, 2016
      Reply

      Hi TravelTiger!
      I finally wrote my last report about my research experiences in Nicaragua. You can read it here:

      http://exploring-gaia.com/asparagus-project-in-nicaragua-final-report/

      Enjoy! 🙂

      Contact me if you have any questions.

  3. Avatar

    Greetings Sarah:

    Thanks for the article. I will share here my airport tips blog post for those who want some more details on how to get through the airport, including the tip to not change money there since they only give you about 4/5ths of the going rate on the street or in a bank.

    http://www.elportonverde.com/2012/06/10/arriving-at-mga/

    Cheers, Mike @ Farmstay El Porton Verde, Managua

  4. Avatar
    September 1, 2015
    Reply

    And this is the website http://www.ojonicaragua.com Find us on Facebook and Twitter too!

  5. Avatar
    September 1, 2015
    Reply

    For those staying in Managua a few days, Ojo Nicaragua gives you a guide to restaurantes, bars, cafés, events and culture! Don’t miss out, Managua has more to offer than you might think! 🙂

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